Towards Better Democracy

Good words, well written, better the world. Good literature betters the world immeasurably.

Likes


Come on guys, of the numbers of visitors yesterday, there were only 10 percent likes. Is the site really that bad }:

Malcolm D B Munro
Saturday 27 January, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under: Arts, Media, Music, poetry, songs, stories

Trinadians in Notting Hill: Trinidad Carnivals in 1977


Trinadians in Notting Hill: Trinidad Carnivals in 1977

For some reason people from Trinidad and Tobago flocked to London in the fifties and sixties. Why I don’t know. What they did, though, was to introduce to Britain, London at least, colour and a vibrant culture quite in contrast to the natives still under the exhaustion of fighting, and winning, WWII. Britain was then a dull grey place where people walked with head hung low and noses scraping along the pavement. The contrast with the new immigrant islanders could not have been greater.

The film of course is not set in Notting Hill but the music is what those war weary Londoners would have heard. Although the music does not sound much on the sound track, I assure you, in the streets of London at the time, it was spectacular, even shocking.

The Notting Hill Festival survives to this day though what you see is far from what Londoners saw then. What is the same is the sheer exuberance and colour. Especially when you are stood on the pavement and these musicians and dancers and festival participants and a few feet away from you.

Malcolm D B Munro
Sunday 21 January, 2018

 

 

 

Filed under: Current Events

The Home of Calypso, the Limbo and Trinadian Steel Bands


 

Malcolm D B Munro
Sunday 21 January, 2018

Note: The music accompanying the voiceover has nothing to do with the music of the Islands of Trinidad and Tobago. Likely the tourists whom the speaker is addressing never heard the native music whilst there. Pity.  The music you hear is exactly the sort I would hear at the Ross Bandstand, see earlier post.

Filed under: Arts, Media

1950s Trinidad Travelogue with Lord Inventor and Steel Band 86294


1950s Trinidad Travelogue with Lord Inventor and Steel Band 86294

Screen Shot 2018-01-21 at 19.03.27

Ross Bandstand, Edinburgh, Scotland

Growing up in Edinburgh in the 1950’s and 1960’s there was little public music places where you could go listen to music. We were dirt poor. Well, actually, we were too poor to even afford dirt.

The only place I knew of was the Ross Bandstand in Princes’ Street Gardens lying in a deep shallow that was once a lake. Princes’ Street runs along the North side and the Castle rises high up, towering up on the South side. The East side of  Princes’ Street Gardens on the other side over tve. he Mound, under which is the Waverley Station was unattractive but the West side beautiful. This is where the Ross Bandstand is.

For most of the summer military bands played every Saturday and Sunday. Every Regiment in Britain, Army, Navy or Air Force has its own band. The  Coldstream Guards or the most famous of these. Tunes they might play included “It’s a Long Way to Tipperary.” They bands were led by a conductor and this tune is memorable for the story the conductor told that day as to the origins of the song. Of course, he was joking but it was fun.

There were other musical attractions besides the Military Bands. My favourites were Trinadian Steel Bands. The steel bands were always instrumental but time plays funny tricks so they may have sung as well.

When one does a search for such music, more recent forms of Trinadian Steel Bands sound quite unlike those I heard during those years. The music now has been commercialised and has quite lost its roots and the simplicity of the sound of those bands.

However, this link captures in a few places how the steel bands sounded. You have to listen carefully to catch them.

The writeup from the YouTube is worth copying:

Directed by Arthur Cohen, “Steel Bands — Tropical Music” presents the Calypso singer Lord Inventor and a couple of the bands of the island of Trinidad. Lord Inventor was also known by the name Lloyd Merchant. This film was likely sponsored in part by Pan Am, which operated flights to the Piarco Airport in this era. Trinidad (Spanish: “Trinity”) is the larger and more populous of the two major islands and numerous landforms which make up the island nation of Trinidad and Tobago. The island lies 11 km (6.8 mi) off the northeastern coast of Venezuela and sits on the continental shelf of South America. Though part of the South American continent, from a socio-economic standpoint it is often referred to as the southernmost island in the Caribbean. With an area of 4,768 km2 (1,841 sq mi) Many believe the original name for the island in the Arawaks’ language was “Iëre” which meant “Land of the Hummingbird”. Some believe that “Iere” was actually a mispronunciation or corruption by early colonists of the Arawak word “Kairi” which simply means “Island”. Christopher Columbus renamed it “La Isla de la Trinidad” (“The Island of the Trinity”), fulfilling a vow he had made before setting out on his third voyage of exploration. 

Malcolm D B Munro
Sunday 21 January, 2018

 

 

Filed under: Arts, Media, Music, poetry, songs, stories

James Hopkins: Dance of Death


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Dance of Death                                                             James Hopkins, UK

Choi & Lager, Cologne

Malcolm D B Munro
Sunday 21 January, 2018

The Work is copyright the Artist and Image Copyright the Gallery

Click on the number of works and look for the piece I referred to. It ihas a poem embedded in it. Look if fanc

Filed under: Arts, Media, Music, poetry, songs, stories

Likes


I am particularly fond of likes. The likes agains posts indicate their reception. Much of my, what you might call, serious stuff does not evoke many likes. I shall continue with these regardless. Yesterday saw almost as many likes as visits. The highest figure I have seen.

This business of likes extends to Saatchiart.com/malcolmdbmunro. Likes are an unexpected bonus of having my art work on the site. I can never tell what will draw visits, and prove what you might call popular. I will give two examples:

Either way. This is by far and away the most popular of the strictly digital pieces.
Or, rather, it was. Of all the Eco Art  pieces Or rather it was proves popular. Caught me by surprise.

There are works that draw little response many of which I find embarrassing. At 198 works I have plenty of room to weed out those not popular and that I don’t care for, Saatchi Art strongly advised me not to.

To underscore the fact that you can never tell what the response to a work will be, my first sale was for one of my least popular works. I like that one.

Thank you to those who indicate a like. That does’t leave out any of you of course. Visits are welcomed and even eagerly sought.

Malcolm D B Munro
Sunday 21 January, 2018

Filed under: Arts, Media, Music, poetry, songs, stories

Pan in A Minor -Johann Chuckaree


Pan in A Minor -Johann Chuckaree

Malcolm D B Munro
Saturday 20 January, 2018

Filed under: Book Review, Media, poetry, songs, stories

Lord Kitchener – Pan In A Minor


Lord Kitchener – Pan In A Minor

Malcolm D B Munro
Saturday 20 January, 2018

Filed under: Arts, Media, Memoir, Music, poetry, songs, stories

Original Trinidad Steel Band – Island in the sun


Original Trinidad Steel Band – Island in the sun

Malcolm D B Munro
Saturday 20 January, 2018

Filed under: Arts, Media, Music, poetry, songs, stories

Al St John’s Trinidad & Tobago Steelband – Yellow Bird


Al St John’s Trinidad & Tobago Steelband – Yellow Bird

Malcolm D B Munro
Saturday 20 January, 2018

Filed under: Arts, Media, Music, poetry, songs, stories

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